OASW ONLINE COURSE

“Resistance is in our DNA”
Addressing Anti-Black Racism in Social Work Practice

 

Presenters:

Jana Vinsky MSW, RSW of Liberation Practice International (LPI) Inc., and Dr. Akua Benjamin will share their decades of experience working with anti-Black racism, to help you integrate anti-Black racism theory and approaches in your practice and organization.

Description & Learning Goals:

With the recent global attention on anti-Black racism, many of us social workers have been questioning if we have done enough to address anti-Black racism in our practice, as well as in the world at large. This workshop will begin to explore such questions, as we examine what anti-Black racism is and how to address it in our everyday social work practice. We will also learn how critical reflective practice can help us operationalize anti-Black racism theory into our everyday social work practice, at all levels, and in all roles. The workshop will be reflective and interactive.

Audience:

This training has been designed for social workers who work in community-based settings supporting mental health for adults, youth, and/or older adults.

REGISTER

 

SESSION

Thursday October 21st, 2021  - REGISTER
1:00pm – 5:00pm  

COST

$200 OASW Members   
$250 Non-Members
Jana Vinsky, MSW, RSW is the co-founder of Liberation Practice International (LPI) Inc.  Jana has supported Human Service Workers for over 30 years, in her role as an equity educator. Jana has taught internationally in 7 countries on critical reflective practice. Jana worked as a university lecturer teaching 9 courses at Ryerson School of Social Work. She also worked as a social worker in frontline, management and on a provincial level, where she led the development of a service delivery model to address disproportionality and disparities facing African Canadians in child welfare, as well as led the development of the Aunties and Uncles Program that helps match Black children and youth in foster care with adult "aunties and uncles" from their communities to help youth stay connected to their culture and heritage. She is trained in Brief and Narrative Therapy through a three-year externship programme, where she furthered the development of the LPI model. Jana specializes in working with white leadership on anti-Black racism, to support change in the human services, through an LPI coaching program.

Dr. Akua Benjamin provides training and consulting to staff and management on issues of anti-Black racism, as well as diversity, human rights, anti-oppression, anti discrimination, and equitable service delivery to clients and consumers of private and public sector organizations and, in particular, community-based agencies. For over 30 years, Dr. Benjamin has been engaged voluntarily in community work centred on issues of equality and social justice for individuals, groups, and communities. She has worked around issues such as policing, child welfare, immigration, health care, social welfare, education, and employment with youth, families, and women in African Canadian communities, as well as with other racialized communities, and in the wider women’s community. Dr. Benjamin has worked extensively with coalitions that focus on meaningful social, economic, and political change. These coalitions advocated on issues such as apartheid, labour rights, access to health care, the rights of foreign domestics, free trade, women’s rights, self-determination for First Nations Peoples, and for freedom, democracy, and peace in developing countries. Dr. Benjamin was the first to theorize anti-Black racism, a concept that emerged out of the struggles in the Black community. Dr. Benjamin was a member of a team of academics who concluded a five-year research project entitled, Racism, Violence and Health – The impact of violence on the health and wellbeing of African Canadians. As such she is one of the co-authors of the book entitled Race and Well Being – The Lives, Hopes and Activism of African Canadians (2010) Fernwood Press, Halifax. In addition, Dr. Benjamin was one of nine Canadian women nominated in a group of 1000 women across the globe for the 2005 Nobel Peace Prize. Dr. Akua Benjamin is the first Black Director of Social Work at Ryerson University in Toronto and is presently a professor emeritus. Prior to her academic position, Dr. Benjamin worked as a Psychiatric Social Worker and Addictions Counsellor.